Posted in Write On Wednesday

Write on Wednesday #50: Thank you Georgia Butler!

Today is my 50th Write on Wednesday!  To celebrate this milestone, this prompt is dedicated to my 9th grade English teacher, Georgia Butler.  For many years after graduating from high school and graduating from college with a degree in English, I search for all of my English teachers specifically to tell them how much they inspired me to pursue writing. Ms. Butler left my high school to take a position as a principal in a neighboring town shortly after my 9th grade year.  I lost touch with her and was unable to find her.  About two weeks ago, I ran into her at the grocery store!  She could not believe I recognized her.  It has been 30 years since the last time I saw her but, I recognized her immediately.  I couldn’t wait to tell her what I was doing and that writing and education is still a huge part of my life and that I now work in higher education.

I have always valued education in all forms but, I have a tremendous amount of respect for those who teach our young children.  As with my first Write on Wednesday post I honor a teacher who left a lasting impression on me, but there is also a prompt in line with the them of this post.

 

Today’s Writing Prompt:  Write a Lesson Plan

Teaching takes time, planning, dedication, and effort.  It is not a small feat to create a lesson plan.  Pick any subject you like.  Take into account learning styles, audience, and objectives. This is a great writing exercise to practice something different.  It will work every area of your brain.

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Posted in Write On Wednesday

Write on Wednesday #49

Today’s Writing Prompt:  Can I get an Amen!

This is your time to pontificate.  Write a sermon.  Choose your audience and your cause and let it go!

Posted in Write On Wednesday

Write on Wednesday #46

 

Today’s Writing Prompt:  Let me tell you something!

Have you ever had an argument, but long after the argument ends you think of all the things you could have said.  Write about it.  Tell that person what your really meant.

Posted in Write On Wednesday

Write on Wednesday #46 What is your book about?

broken-pencil

Like many writers, I plan on finishing a novel.  I have been working on one for a while.  I have had some articles and short stories published, but I have yet to have a published novel.  Many of my friends and acquaintances ask if I have written, or in the process of writing a book.  When I tell them  I am working on a novel, the next question is “What is it about?”

Years ago attended a writing workshop in my town and sat in a room filled with aspiring authors.  When it was time for us to ask questions, one of the attendees raised her hand an asked for tips on getting an agent.  Then she went on to tell what her book was about.  After about 5 solid minutes of awkward starts, backtracks, and confused faces, she ended with “I have a title.  It’s called Saturday Night at the Disco.” Even as I cringed along with everyone else as she bumbled through her attempt to describe her book, I wondered if I could do a better job.

Part of my current job is helping students succeed academically.  I help them with time management, study skills, critical thinking, etc.  I am often looking for various ways and techniques on how to improve study skills.  One method is the Feynman Technique. If you are not familiar with the Feynman Technique, it is essentially  explaining something in  language simple enough for a young child to understand and, by doing so, you too are gaining a better understanding of the subject.  After explaining this technique with several students I realized that this technique is a great way to fill plot holes and confusion in you own work.

If you want to be a published author and plan to go the traditional route of finding an agent, you will have to write a query letter.  You will have to be able to sell your book in a few sentences.  One way to do this is with the Feynman Technique.

 

iBourgie’s Guide to Writing your Query Letter Using the Feynman Technique

  1. Write down your tentative title.
  2. Write down the plot as if explaining it to an 8-year-old child
  3. Review what you have written (or if you have an 8-year-old handy, ask them to read it to see if they can follow it.  If they cant..
  4. Look for the confusing parts and clear them up.  This may be a great time to also look through your work to see if that confusion exists in it as well.
  5. Finally, make any adjustments using plain language

I really is that simple.  If it is too hard for you to apply this technique, you have a little more work to do.  Enjoy the journey!

Posted in Think About it Thursday

Keep it Simple

the-daily-mantra-relax-relate-release-sundaysbest-thedailymantra-wisdom-wordstoliveby-goldenrule-t

In life we often try to make things more complicated than they are.  If we can just take the time to listen to what our hearts, minds, and bodies are telling us, we can face the world and all its challenges with confidence.

 

Posted in Uncategorized

7 Ways to Expertly Edit Your Own Writing – Helping Writers Become Authors

How can you effectively edit your own writing? Here are seven tips to help you objectively improve your book.

Source: 7 Ways to Expertly Edit Your Own Writing – Helping Writers Become Authors

Posted in Write On Wednesday

Write on Wednesday #45

on-this-day

Today’s Writing Prompt:  On this day…

Today is a very special day for me.  Over 40 years ago, my best friend was born.  She is an amazing, beautiful, and successful woman and I am so glad that she is a part of my life.

For today’s writing prompt, pick a day that is special for you and find out what other things happened on that day in history.  Use this to inspire your writing.  I have listed a few links below to help get you started.

 

http://www.on-this-day.com/

http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history

http://learning.blogs.nytimes.com/on-this-day/?_r=0