Write on Wednesday #46 What is your book about?

broken-pencil

Like many writers, I plan on finishing a novel.  I have been working on one for a while.  I have had some articles and short stories published, but I have yet to have a published novel.  Many of my friends and acquaintances ask if I have written, or in the process of writing a book.  When I tell them  I am working on a novel, the next question is “What is it about?”

Years ago attended a writing workshop in my town and sat in a room filled with aspiring authors.  When it was time for us to ask questions, one of the attendees raised her hand an asked for tips on getting an agent.  Then she went on to tell what her book was about.  After about 5 solid minutes of awkward starts, backtracks, and confused faces, she ended with “I have a title.  It’s called Saturday Night at the Disco.” Even as I cringed along with everyone else as she bumbled through her attempt to describe her book, I wondered if I could do a better job.

Part of my current job is helping students succeed academically.  I help them with time management, study skills, critical thinking, etc.  I am often looking for various ways and techniques on how to improve study skills.  One method is the Feynman Technique. If you are not familiar with the Feynman Technique, it is essentially  explaining something in  language simple enough for a young child to understand and, by doing so, you too are gaining a better understanding of the subject.  After explaining this technique with several students I realized that this technique is a great way to fill plot holes and confusion in you own work.

If you want to be a published author and plan to go the traditional route of finding an agent, you will have to write a query letter.  You will have to be able to sell your book in a few sentences.  One way to do this is with the Feynman Technique.

 

iBourgie’s Guide to Writing your Query Letter Using the Feynman Technique

  1. Write down your tentative title.
  2. Write down the plot as if explaining it to an 8-year-old child
  3. Review what you have written (or if you have an 8-year-old handy, ask them to read it to see if they can follow it.  If they cant..
  4. Look for the confusing parts and clear them up.  This may be a great time to also look through your work to see if that confusion exists in it as well.
  5. Finally, make any adjustments using plain language

I really is that simple.  If it is too hard for you to apply this technique, you have a little more work to do.  Enjoy the journey!

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Write on Wednesday #43

past-lives (1)

Today’s Writing Prompt:  Write your own history.

I have always wondered about my ancestors.  I have been able to go back as far as about five or six generations, but that’s it.  I have often been told stories about how I am a decedent of this person or that person, but I never knew if it was true.  Maybe my history isn’t as exciting as it has been told to me.  The writer in my says it can be as exciting as I make it.  Create your own history as you imagine it to be.  You can start with your last name.  Create an origin and start from there, or it could be a family trait that many of you family members share.  Be very creative.

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Write on Wednesday #42

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Today’s Writing Prompt:  What if…?

Have you ever wondered what your life would be like if you got the man/woman of your dreams, won the lottery, been born with a special talent?  For today’s writing prompt write about what that would be like.  If you would like a little more of a challenge, write about how having the thing you’ve always wanted made your life worse.

 

Write on Wednesday #41

woman-reading-book

Today’s Writing Prompt: Take the title of the last book you read and come up with another story based on that title.

Write on Wednesday #38

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Today’s Writing Prompt:  Write about a visual.

I few years ago I took a class called Writing about the Arts.  I absolutely loved the class and it was taught by one of my favorite professors.  We went to museums, concerts, plays, etc., and had to write about each event.  It was refreshing to do this different type of writing that welcomed me to use all of my senses.

For this writing prompt find a painting, play, concert, or any visual art to write about.

 

Write on Wednesday #34

Eugène_Ferdinand_Victor_Delacroix_006

Today’s writing prompt:  You wake up next to a lake of fire.  There is a man named Virgil standing next to you.  He tells you that he knows you did everything you could bu,t you did not make it to heaven.  Then he welcomes you to Hell.  Try to figure out why you ended up there.  Go and explore.  In which circle will you remain?

 

I loved reading Dante’s Inferno, but it scared the heck out of me.  This prompt may require a little reading up, but  of course, that is always a good thing.

Harper Lee – Inspiration for the writing life – The Writer

I never turn down an opportunity to learn from others, especially other writers.  We all need encouragement and confirmation to keep going.

Harper Lee inspired generations of writers, including Loretta Ellsworth, who shares insights into lessons learned while writing “In Search of Mockingbird.”

Source: Harper Lee – Inspiration for the writing life – The Writer