Posted in Uncategorized, Write On Wednesday

Write on Wednesday #55

 

Today’s Writing Prompt:  Your Most Embarrassing Moment

Do you recall a time when you were so embarrassed you thought you would never recover from it?  Write about it.  Describe what happened, the reactions you noticed, and how you felt.  You can even write about how you would have liked to prevent it or rectify the embarrassment.

Advertisements
Posted in Write On Wednesday

Write on Wednesday #54

 

Today’s Writing Prompt:  Your favorite gift

Do you have a gift that  stands out it your mind?  Was it unexpected?  Was it a gift to someone else? How did they react?  Write about something you gave or received as a gift.  What was special about it?  Try to describe the the feelings you felt when you gave or received it.

Posted in Write On Wednesday

Write on Wednesday #52

Today’s Writing Prompt:  Write about the arts

I few years ago I took a class titled Writing About the Arts.  I loved this class because it was taught by one of my favorite professors.  In addition to writing about the arts, we attended concerts, visited museums, and plays.  It was a wonder class and I learned a lot about how to paint a picture with words.

For this week’s prompt, write about a piece of artwork, a concert, or a performance.

 

Posted in Write On Wednesday

Write on Wednesday #51

 

I love words.  I love obscure, barely-used words.  I love using them in random situations.  Have you ever heard a word that you have been dying to use, but you never find the opportunity to use it?  Now is your chance.  Write something based on that word.  Let it spark your creativity or explain why you love it.

Posted in Write On Wednesday

Write on Wednesday #46

 

Today’s Writing Prompt:  Let me tell you something!

Have you ever had an argument, but long after the argument ends you think of all the things you could have said.  Write about it.  Tell that person what your really meant.

Posted in Write On Wednesday

Write on Wednesday #46 What is your book about?

broken-pencil

Like many writers, I plan on finishing a novel.  I have been working on one for a while.  I have had some articles and short stories published, but I have yet to have a published novel.  Many of my friends and acquaintances ask if I have written, or in the process of writing a book.  When I tell them  I am working on a novel, the next question is “What is it about?”

Years ago attended a writing workshop in my town and sat in a room filled with aspiring authors.  When it was time for us to ask questions, one of the attendees raised her hand an asked for tips on getting an agent.  Then she went on to tell what her book was about.  After about 5 solid minutes of awkward starts, backtracks, and confused faces, she ended with “I have a title.  It’s called Saturday Night at the Disco.” Even as I cringed along with everyone else as she bumbled through her attempt to describe her book, I wondered if I could do a better job.

Part of my current job is helping students succeed academically.  I help them with time management, study skills, critical thinking, etc.  I am often looking for various ways and techniques on how to improve study skills.  One method is the Feynman Technique. If you are not familiar with the Feynman Technique, it is essentially  explaining something in  language simple enough for a young child to understand and, by doing so, you too are gaining a better understanding of the subject.  After explaining this technique with several students I realized that this technique is a great way to fill plot holes and confusion in you own work.

If you want to be a published author and plan to go the traditional route of finding an agent, you will have to write a query letter.  You will have to be able to sell your book in a few sentences.  One way to do this is with the Feynman Technique.

 

iBourgie’s Guide to Writing your Query Letter Using the Feynman Technique

  1. Write down your tentative title.
  2. Write down the plot as if explaining it to an 8-year-old child
  3. Review what you have written (or if you have an 8-year-old handy, ask them to read it to see if they can follow it.  If they cant..
  4. Look for the confusing parts and clear them up.  This may be a great time to also look through your work to see if that confusion exists in it as well.
  5. Finally, make any adjustments using plain language

I really is that simple.  If it is too hard for you to apply this technique, you have a little more work to do.  Enjoy the journey!